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Information

Author: Phaedrus - 41 AD

Translated into English
  by C. Smart - 1887

Source: The Fables of Phaedrus

Original title (Latin):
Mustela et Homo

Country of origin: Italy

Translations

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Adaptations

Esopet (Middle Dutch) - viewaligned

The Man and the Weasel

Phaedrus / C. Smart

A Weasel, by a person caught,
And willing to get off; besought
The man to spare. "Be not severe
On him that keeps your pantry clear
"This were," says he, "a work of price,
Of those intolerable mice."
If done entirely for my sake,
And good had been the plea you make:
But since, with all these pains and care,
You seize yourself the dainty fare
On which those vermin used to fall,
And then devour the mice and all,
Urge not a benefit in vain."
This said, the miscreant was slain.
The satire here those chaps will own,
Who, useful to themselves alone,
And bustling for a private end,
Would boast the merit of a friend.